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Join Alice Street's diagnostics research programme! Three year Research Fellow position available

Applications are invited for a research fellow position in the Department of Anthropology, University of Edinburgh, to carry out anthropological research on point of care diagnostic devices in resource-limited settings. This is a full time position for three years and is funded by the European Research Council as part of Dr. Alice Street’s project ‘Investigating the Design and Use of Diagnostic Devices in Global Health’. https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=040607 Closing Date: 5pm (GMT) 21st August 2017

Applications are invited for a research fellow position in the Department of Anthropology, University of Edinburgh, to carry out anthropological research on point of care diagnostic devices in resource-limited settings. This is a full time position for three years and is funded by the European Research Council as part of Dr. Alice Street’s project ‘Investigating the Design and Use of Diagnostic Devices in Global Health’. 
 https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=040607
Closing Date: 5pm (GMT) 21st August 2017
Job Description
You will join the ERC-funded research project “Investigating the Design and Use of Diagnostic Devices in Global Health,” led by Dr Alice Street, to conduct research on the role of diagnostic devices in public health emergencies and their aftermath, with a focus on the 2014 Ebola outbreak response in Sierra Leone. You will have a PhD in a relevant area (e.g. anthropology, science and technology studies, geography), experience undertaking ethnographic research, and be familiar with critical studies of global health. The post will involve extended fieldwork in Sierra Leone and short-term travel to mainland Europe.
DiaDev explores interactions between technical innovation and health systems strengthening in the design, development and use of point of care diagnostic devices in resource-limited settings. You will carry out research on the role of diagnostic devices during and after the 2014 Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in Sierra Leone. There are three key research areas, which will entail a combination of document-based, interview and ethnographic research:

• The liminal role of emergency diagnostics in clinical care, surveillance and research. 
• The ecology of actors involved in accelerated diagnostic development. 
• The changing role of diagnostics in contexts of emergency, aftermath and preparedness.

In addition, you will contribute to capacity building elements of the project, public engagement and knowledge exchange activities, and assist with background research for other project components. The post will involve extended fieldwork in Sierra Leone and short-term travel to mainland Europe.

Edinburgh Students